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Here you will find the latest articles written by our insulation specialists focusing on product developments, building regulations and technical guidance notes.

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Author Archives: Debbie Berger

is a Product Manager within the Celotex Marketing team and is responsible for new product innovation as well as ensuring the performance of existing products. Debbie works hard to understand how Celotex products are used from the perspective of the customer and uses these insights to shape product innovation.


IMPORTANT: On 1 September 2017, Celotex took the precautionary measure to temporarily suspend the supply of Celotex FR5000, Celotex CG5000, Celotex CF5000 and Celotex SL5000 while we investigate the results of recent tests (Parts 6 and 7 of British Standard 476). Materials relating to these products are for information only.

Read More here

What is a cavity wall?

The cavity wall as the name suggests consists of two masonry walls with separated by a clear cavity.  By design the wall resists wind driven rain soaked up by the outer leaf migrating onto the inner surfaces. The width of the cavity has gradually got wider as the years have gone by and in the 1970’s insulation was introduced into the cavity with it becoming compulsory in Building Regulations during the 1990’s.

As part of ‘Factors shaping and driving insulation choice for masonry cavity walls’ I explained how the following impact insulation choice.

  • Compliance to Part L1A 2013 and FEES as part of SAP.
  • Approved Document C part 2.
  • Full BBA Certification Read more »

IMPORTANT: On 1 September 2017, Celotex took the precautionary measure to temporarily suspend the supply of Celotex FR5000, Celotex CG5000, Celotex CF5000 and Celotex SL5000 while we investigate the results of recent tests (Parts 6 and 7 of British Standard 476). Materials relating to these products are for information only.

Read More here

Influencing factors shaping and driving insulation choice for full fill cavity wall

CF5000_0002 (FINAL)

Today sees the launch of Celotex CF5000, a brand new full fill cavity wall solution from Celotex, and so it seems right to look at the influencing factors that drive the insulation choice for this specific application.

Part L1A and FEES

Over the last ten years there have been a number of successive changes to Approved Document Part L1A. Part L1A is concerned with how much energy a new residential building uses and such has a direct impact on the fabric of the building and its ability to conserve energy.

The most recent changes in 2013 included a new metric called FEES. This focuses on improving the fabric of the building to reduce energy consumption or in layman’s terms how often you switch your heating on.  The introduction of FEES meant new homes built in England require a stronger fabric performance to comply with SAP.

SAP compliance is a requirement of Part L1A

So what is FEES?

Read more »

This post will cover the key design considerations when insulating a floor to achieve a good fabric performance.

When it comes to heat loss through the building envelope, floors are fairly low risk.  Only about 15% of heat for an average three bedroom domestic home is lost through floors. This is because heat naturally rises and is lost through other elements such as the roof, walls, doors and windows.  In fact I was reading through some old Part L documents and  up until as recently as 1990, very little insulation was required for ground floors. I could only read this and look amazed as I mentally filed this  information under History. Read more »

Following on from Garage Conversions Part 1: Compliance blog post, we are looking at the key considerations for your garage conversion, with a focus on improving the fabric performance of your floor, walls and roof.

*Note: Since the creation of this post, Celotex GS5000 has been replaced with Celotex GD5000.

To achieve a good quality garage conversion there are three main areas for design and construction professionals to focus on:

  1. The first is designing and building a good fabric performance to limit heat loss through the building envelope.  This means using the correct thickness of insulation to meet the target U-values for the walls, roof and floors, whilst continuing the line of insulation around junctions and openings to limit heat loss and maintain air tightness. The specification of good quality energy efficient windows and doors is also key as they account for the remaining parts of the new thermal envelope.
  2. The second factor to consider when considering the overall energy efficiency is the choice of fuel and heating systems and thirdly the use of lighting and electrical appliances.
  3. As Celotex are insulation specialists, the focus of this blog will be on how to achieve a good fabric performance through the garage floor, walls and roof with a few comments about thermal bridging and air tightness.

Floors

The floor of a garage is usually a concrete slab which is in direct contact with the ground.  It will form part of the new thermal envelope and therefore require insulating to meet 0.25W/m2K U-value.  The finished floor level of the concrete floor is usually lower than that of the main house which means there is room to lay Celotex over the slab.

Celotex FR5000 can be laid across the floor slab with the thickness required dependant on the ratio of exposed perimeter to floor area.  This is worked out by dividing the exposed internal perimeter in linear metres by the internal floor area in m² to give the perimeter/area ratio.

The floor will need to be finished with a layer of screed or timber boards to form a stable surface for foot traffic and furniture etc. The screed is a minimum of 65mm thick and typically a standard sand and cement mix.  The screed laid above the insulation forms a thermal bridge or path of heat loss where it contacts the external wall.  This can be eliminated by placing perimeter edge insulation vertically around the edge of the floor slab. The up stand should have a minimum R-value 0.75m2K/W which can be achieved using Celotex TB4020.

An alternative to laying 65mm screed is a 22mm tongue and grooved floating chipboard floor.  Laid to manufacturer’s instructions this also provides a stable surface but offers a thinner floor build up which is ideal if space is a premium. A perimeter up stand is not required as the chipboard floor doesn’t present the same path of heat loss. Instead Celotex is butted tightly up to the wall.   Any decorative finishes such as carpet or laminated timber boards can then be laid on top of the screed or chipboard floor.

What about membranes…

There are two types of membranes required when upgrading a garage floor.  The first is a damp proof membrane. It’s hard to know if one was used when the floor was first constructed, so in the absence of this knowledge it’s a good idea to lay one over the slab before installing the Celotex.  This will stop any moisture from below ground rising to cause dampness and damage.

The second membrane is a 1000 gauge sheet of polythene. We recommend laying this over the room side of the Celotex before finishing the floor with a layer of screed or timber boards. This not only acts as a vapour control layer to minimise the risk of interstitial condensation forming on the concrete slab but also stops liquid screed migrating between board joints to form thermal bridges.  It also prevents the chemicals in the wet screed reacting with the foil facer to form tiny air bubbles which may potentially weaken the screed.

Walls

Garage walls are usually solid masonry and because they were designed to enclose an unheated space they are commonly ‘single’ masonry and 100mm wide. To make them more stable brick piers are often built into the wall.  These are generally ‘double’ masonry and 200mm wide. This means they occasionally protrude into the floor area.

When upgrading the walls thermally, because the walls are only 100mm thick its key to design an internal lining system that stops the moisture coming in from outside. The easiest method of dry-lining the wall is to fix 25mm x 47mm timber battens which are lined with dpc strips directly to the wall. This method has the advantage of providing a small cavity between the masonry and internal linings as well as a substrate to fix the insulation board.

Celotex GS5050 is fixed to the battens to insulate the walls. This is a thermal laminate made of 50mm of the highest performing Celotex PIR insulation laminated to a 9.5mm plasterboard.  This high performing insulation board has the advantage of giving 0.3W/m2K while taking up a small amount of floor space.

The brick piers if left exposed will bridge through the thermal envelope and become a path for heat loss and present cold spots where surface condensation may form. The line of insulation should be taken around any brick piers rather than butting up either side of them. The idea here is to include them within the thermal envelope.  For the same reasons the insulation should be taken into the reveals and soffits of door and window openings.  Celotex PL4015 can be used for these smaller areas. This is 15mm of Celotex laminated to 9.5mm plasterboard.

The thermal performance of the junction between the wall and floor is maintained because the Celotex GS5000 is continuous with either the Celotex TB4020 used for the perimeter up stand or Celotex FR5000 under the chipboard floor.  As GS5000 is mechanically fixed as opposed to dot and dabbing to the masonry, the continuity of the air barrier around this junction is achieved by sealing the gaps between the skirting board and floor.

Condensation

A vapour control layer is always required on the room side of the insulation. It stops warm moist air getting behind the insulation and condensing on the surface of the masonry wall to form interstitial condensation. Celotex GS5000 has an integral vapour control layer. It is formed by sealing together the tapered edges of the plasterboard with scrim tape and jointing compound to form an effective barrier with a high vapour resistance. It is equally important to seal around the edges and joints of any service openings such as electric sockets and switches. Sealing between the boards joints and around the edges and openings effectively creates an air tight barrier as well as maintain a vapour control layer and helps minimise air leakage and paths of heat loss.

Roof

Single storey garages more commonly have a roof which is flat in construction. The roof is waterproofed with a high moisture resistance membrane such as a bituminous felt. Insulation can be installed between the joists but because the roof covering has high moisture resistance Building Regulations require a 50mm gap for the path of ventilation immediately below the plywood deck. The 50mm path of ventilation is to reduce the risk of interstitial condensation forming on the underside of the plywood deck and settling on the timber rafters. This means the thickness of Celotex FR5000 required is the depth of the joists less 50mm required for the path of ventilation.

The joists are usually not deep enough to fit the thickness of insulation required to achieve the 0.18W/m2K U-value plus allow for the 50mm ventilated airspace above. Celotex GS5000 can be installed as a second layer of insulation to the underside of the joists.  It provides a continuous layer of Celotex to meet the target U-value and because it is has a 9.5mm plasterboard finish it also forms the internal ceiling of the new room.

This prevents having to increase the depth of the rafters by fixing timber battens to the bottom of them between which the extra thickness of Celotex can be installed. The use of GS5000 as a continuous line of insulation also limits the unfavourable impact of repeat thermal bridging on the U-value allowing for a thinner solution and so saves on valuable headroom.

The thermal performance of the junction between the flat roof and wall is depends on how they are constructed.  The main principle to follow is the insulation used to line the wall internally meets and/or overlaps with the insulation fixed to the underside of the joists.  All gaps are sealed along the length of the junction to maintain air tightness.

The importance of a vapour control layer…

Condensation is formed when warm moist air rises and condenses into a liquid on contact with the colder surfaces above the insulation. As warm moist air naturally rises the risk of interstitial condensation with any roof construction needs to be carefully managed. So for this reason a vapour control layer is doubly important when upgrading a garage roof.

As mentioned before, Celotex GS5000 has an integral vapour control layer and blocks warm moist air rising into the pitched roof structure.  However, warm moist air by its very nature will always find the passage of least resistance so the use of a 50mm ventilated air gap between the joists in conjunction with a vapour control will effectively manage the small amount of condensation that will inevitably form

…And finally

The process of a garage conversion passes through a number of stages from the initial idea, obtaining planning permission (if required), preparing a detail design and getting approval from the local building control. It’s at this stage the search for a good builder starts and then the final stage is the construction process.

There are two stages which present the best time to ensure a quality energy efficient conversion.  This is the detailed design stage where the correct materials and services are not only specified but also drawn to show they are used together without conflict or compromising a good fabric performance. The second stage is the construction process, that the builder is knowledgeable of the materials specified and is fully skilled in the correct installation. This allows for the as built standards to be equal to the design standards. Both these factors will affect the overall energy efficiency of the conversion and if done to correctly will bring about a new, sustainable and comfortable habitable space.

For advice on your project get in touch with the Technical Centre, or find out more about how Celotex GD5000, FR5000, TB4000 and PL4000 can improve the fabric performance of your garage.

*Note: Since the creation of this post, Celotex GS5000 has been replaced with Celotex GD5000.

The importance of roofing insulation for energy  efficiency

First of all, let’s consider the importance of the roof for ensuring energy efficiency. Warm air has a natural tendency to rise upwards and is lost through the fabric of the roof if it is un-insulated; therefore this element alone can account for as much as 25% of a buildings heat loss.

Insulating along the sloping rafters forms a warm roof and is an option for both new builds and refurbishment projects. The insulation can be installed between the rafters and underneath the rafters to extend the thermal envelope up along the pitch of the roof, allowing for a new heated room within the loft space. This popular application requires some careful design considerations to minimise the risk of interstitial condensation and guidance on how to meet target U-values as set out in the current Building Regulations.

In fact, at the Celotex Technical Centre when it comes to pitched roofs, the most popular questions asked are ‘How much Celotex do I need to meet current Building Regulations? Which Celotex board is the best one to use? Do I need a vapour control layer?’

Well to answer these highly popular questions…

….the thickness of Celotex required to meet a U-value in line with current Building Regulations depends entirely on the depth of the rafters and if there is a requirement to fully ventilate or not.

When does a pitched roof need ventilating…?

….The ventilation requirements of a pitched roof depends on the type of roof membrane used under the tiles or slates and battens to keep moisture or rainwater coming in from outside.  If the roof covering or roof membrane is a material of high moisture resistance or impermeable, then the building regulations require a 50mm wide ventilation gap beneath the roofing felt and tiles.  This is typical practice when an old fashioned black sarking felt is in place and commonly found in existing buildings.

http://www.celotex.co.uk/applications/pitched-roof-insulation/between-rafters

The 50mm path of ventilation is to reduce the risk of interstitial condensation forming on the underside of the impermeable felt membrane and settling on the timber rafters. It is generally formed by using eaves ventilators and ridge or abutment ventilators.  This allows for air to enter in one opening and exit the other forming a cross flow of ventilation. This is known as a ‘fully ventilated’ airspace as opposed to an ‘unventilated’ air space.

Alternatively, an unventilated pitched roof may be designed.  The principle applied here is warm moist air rising from below is allowed to permeate through the roof membrane removing the need to fully ventilate the roof.  This means the impervious roofing felt with a high moisture resistance is replaced with a more permeable membrane or a breathable membrane.  The 50mm ventilation gap, as well as the ridge ventilators, is no longer required but instead the airspace may be left unventilated.

This simplifies the design and leaves more space between the rafters for insulation. The actual airspace required below the membrane is better confirmed by a third party certificate as provided by the manufacturer, but it’s commonly accepted that the airspace can be 25mm or less.

And so….

…the thickness of Celotex FR5000 placed between the rafters is the depth of the rafters less the depth of the airspace above. For example, where rafters are 150mm deep and a black sarking membrane is used, then 100mm of FR5000 can be installed which still leaves a 50mm gap for a fully ventilated airspace.  Another example, where rafters are 175mm deep and a breathable membrane is used then 150mm FR5000 can be installed while maintaining 25mm unventilated airspace above.

One thing both a ventilated and unventilated roof space have in common is the rafters are not usually deep enough to fit the thickness of insulation required to achieve a target U-value, plus allow for either the ventilated or unventilated airspace above. Celotex GD5000 can be installed as a second layer of insulation to the underside of the rafters. It provides a continuous layer of Celotex to meet the target U-value and because it is has a 12.5mm plasterboard finish it also forms the internal ceiling of the new room.

This prevents increasing the depth of the rafters by fixing timber battens to the bottom of them between which the extra thickness of Celotex can be installed. The use of Celotex GD5000 as a continuous line of insulation also limits the unfavourable impact of repeat thermal bridging on the U-value allowing for a thinner solution and so saves on valuable headroom.

Why do I need a vapour control layer when the roof is ventilated or a breathable membrane is used?

A vapour control layer in conjunction with the correct use of ventilation and roof membranes will effectively eliminate the risk of interstitial condensation. It’s the two design principles working together that minimise the damaging effects of condensation on the timber structure.

Condensation is formed when warm moist air rises and condenses into a liquid on contact with the colder surfaces above the insulation. The idea behind a vapour control layer is to install it on the room side of the insulation so it blocks the passage of warm moist air rising into the pitched roof structure.  However, warm moist air by its very nature will always find the passage of least resistance so the use of roof membranes and ventilation will effectively manage the small amount of condensation that will inevitably form.

Celotex GS5000 has an integral vapour control layer built in. It is positioned between the plasterboard and Celotex foam insulation. When the boards are tightly butted together, the tapered edges of the plasterboard are sealed with scrim tape and jointing compound to form an effective vapour control layer with a high vapour resistance.

…beyond the U-value

Insulation is effective within the pitched roof but a strong fabric performance means the design and installation extends beyond the U-value and thicknesses of Celotex. The construction materials used to form the fabric of the roof each have different thermal and moisture properties; how they come together impacts the building physics and the way a building uses energy.

To ensure the roof is built to a high standard the design shows how junctions and openings are insulated and finished to maintain a continuous thermal envelope and air tightness. This plays an important factor when meeting the required energy targets of the current Building Regulations.

Find out more about specifying Celotex FR5000 and Celotex GD5000 for insulation purposes.

Part L the approved document setting out guidelines for the conservation of fuel and power has been revised and a new edition goes live on 6th April 2014.

Amongst the changes include the introduction of:

  • 6% aggregate reduction of CO₂emissions
  • A new compulsory target based on the energy efficiency of the building fabric (FEES).  FEES sets a maximum limit on the amount of energy normally required to ensure a comfortable internal temperature in the home.
  • A new notional building to replace the existing first introduced in 2002. The new notional building promotes a strong fabric performance and sets out domestic targets for various elements linked to the building envelope. The domestic targets will for some allow consistency of specification across building types.

So as the 6th of April fast approaches what do these changes really mean and how do they affect new projects in the pipeline?

What does the 6th April actually mean?

If plans for your project have been submitted to Building Control or a Local Authority before 6th April, compliance to Part L 2013 will not apply. This is providing work has commenced on site before 6th April. This is what’s known as ‘The Transitional Arrangement’. The changes to Part L 2013 will only apply to plans submitted after 6th April 2014.

When should a SAP calculation be carried out?

Simply put, a SAP calculation is required to demonstrate a dwellings’ compliance of CO₂ emissions (TER) and Energy Consumption (TFEES) to Part L 2013.  SAP is a desktop exercise and is applied to the project both at design stage and at the final ‘as built’ stage.  A completed SAP calculation creates an Energy Performance Certificate based on the dwelling as built and is required to be displayed in a new dwelling put up for sale or rent on the open market.

It is favourable to introduce a SAP calculation at the earliest design stages. This allows the Architect to make changes to the design if at first it does not comply to the TER and TFEES required within the notional building.

If the SAP is first performed later on in the design process, perhaps by the contractor, and it fails to hit the required targets, it will be more difficult to alter elements affecting the fabric performance. For example, changing the width of a wall or altering the depth of rafters.

Have you got any handy hints to help comply with the new Regulations?

The new notional building and the introduction of a target for energy consumption points to adopting a ‘fabric first’ approach to compliance. This means ensuring the building envelope complies with key fabric targets and so prevents heat loss and reduces energy demand.

So…

Handy hint no 1: The notional building seeks good U-values through the roof, walls and floors.  It will no longer be possible to achieve compliance using backstop values without the considerable upgrade of other key fabric targets.

Handy hint No 2: There is a new requirement for airtightness within the notional building setting a minimum value of 5m3/(h.m2) @ 50Pa.  This means tightening up on uncontrolled air leakage by correctly finishing and sealing internal linings as well as considering the benefits of air tight barriers.  Anything less than this target will mean the introduction of controlled ventilation.

Handy hint No 3:  Thermal bridging forms a key component to compliance. The junctions between walls with floors and roofs will need to be detailed to a standard better than Accredited Construction Details. In some cases there may be a requirement for the junctions to be modelled by an independent energy assessor in order to achieve compliance.

Handy hint No 4:  Party walls are fully filled and sealed to achieve the 0W/m²K required in the new notional building.

And finally, something to think about…

The changes introduced into Part L 2013 applicable to domestic dwellings are seen as a step towards the Government’s target of zero carbon in 2016.  This has introduced a fabric first approach when designing new domestic dwellings meaning key fabric energy targets are the focus for compliance.  With the 2016 zero carbon target in mind there are some that suggest targets within the new notional building are the minimum standards required especially as Part L consultations led us to expect CO₂ reductions greater than 6% on aggregate.

The key fabric energy targets for the new notional building in Part L1A 2013 is an improvement over Part L1A 2010 but should designers aim to exceed the TER and TFEE? A final SAP calculation of the DER and DFEE rate is required to take into account any changes in performance between design and construction.  It could be that designing to standards better than TER and TFEE not only has a favourable impact on CO2 emissions, it also allows for any last minute changes in design and so ensures building performance while adopting a fabric first approach.

For more information on the UK Building Regulations and to download your Part L Guide, visit the Insulating Britain website.

#InsulatingBritain

It’s been an amazing last few days as we have all got on board with the changes to the new Part L 2013 for England due to go live April 6th. In particular, it is with great excitement we welcome one particular change to how domestic NEW builds achieve compliance and that is the introduction of a compulsory metric for the performance of the building fabric as part of SAP (TFEE). The introduction of this new metric is a step towards the 2016 target that all newly built dwellings should be net zero carbon.  This means new buildings after 2016 will not add further to CO² emissions.

In the midst of focusing on the changes to the new Part L 2013, I just wanted to pause from all the excitement, take a step back and think about the other half of the Part L story.  The part that’s not changing and that’s energy efficiency measures for EXISTING domestic and non-domestic buildings. This includes our homes, work places and social venues, childcare centres and public buildings to name but a few. (Wales aside, they are introducing their own compliance guidelines for the conservation of fuel and power to include existing buildings which are called Part L 2014 Wales due to go live 31st July).

Carbon Emissions

The Climate change Act 2008 requires that by 2050 UK’s annual Carbon Dioxide emissions are reduced by 80% compared to 1990 levels.  It is understood that home energy use is responsible for over 25% of UK’s CO² emissions and whilst the Government’s commitment to net zero carbon target for 2016 seems to be on course, the 2050 target presents the nagging question ‘Should we be improving the energy performance of existing dwellings as well as new dwellings to achieve the required 80% cut in CO² emissions across the entire housing stock?’

Having said this and I don’t want to spoil the party,  there’s an undeniable fact that homes built before 2016 will still exist in 2050 and so will be the subject of a refurbishment project to further improve the standard of energy efficiency in order to meet the 2050 target of 80% reduced CO² emissions. 

Even more reason to support the fabric first approach in today’s designs, do that little bit more today to protect tomorrow and why we welcome the new compulsory target fabric energy efficiency metric in SAP.

So having made the point ‘what about existing dwellings, they’re relevant too?’ what can we do, as professionals in the industry, to support the Government’s long term goal of an 80% reduction in CO² emissions in dwellings? 

ECO and Green Deal

Well the good news is the consultation document on the future of ECO (the Energy Company Obligation) was published 5th March and will run until 16th April. Its goal is to reduce pressures on consumer bills and provide value for money to consumers.  In doing so, it will tackle fuel poverty, support the development of sustainable energy efficiency supply chain and improve energy efficiency of our housing stock.  This will hopefully make funding more simple and supply more accessible.

So while the officials work to provide more certainty to ECO and the green deal, we can try to better understand and become more familiar with what reducing CO² emissions look like in our existing homes.  How do we approach a sustainable refurbishment project and translate the reduction in CO² emissions into improvements around the house which will mean less energy consumption and lower energy bills?

Fabric First

Adopting a fabric first whole house approach is a really good place to start. This allows for detailed planning and careful preparation when considering how to form the thermal envelope of a building. Key areas for design consideration when adopting a fabric first approach include

  • Building fabric U-values of floors, walls and roofs
  • U-values of windows and doors
  • Thermal bridging
  • Air Tightness
  • Thermal Mass

Knowing when…

…to improve the energy efficiency of the building is key. Refurbishment projects can be costly so may occur once or twice in a 20 year period.  With this in mind it makes sense to take every opportunity where practical to achieve the best possible level of thermal upgrading during a refurbishment. Timely opportunities include having a new kitchen fitted, an extension built, re-roofing or re-plastering are but a few.

There are other positive measures that can be taken to improve the CO² emissions of a building such as introducing a more efficient boiler for hot water and heating and using energy efficient light bulbs to name but a few but these are not directly linked to the building envelope and the fabric.  Having a fantastically efficient boiler is brilliant but if the fabric is poorly insulated all that lovely warmth will escape meaning further energy consumption.

We can only wait to see how the other half of the Part L story unfolds in the future. It’s no secret that a significant portion of the existing housing stock has poor levels of insulation and airtightness which increase heating demand and energy consumption. Adopting a fabric first approach for the whole of the building when planning a sustainable refurbishment project will minimise heat loss through the building envelope.  This in return will reduce the heating demand and energy consumption of the property which in turn again will have a favourable impact on the reduction of CO² emissions and the target set for 2050.

For more information on the UK Building Regulations visit the Insulating Britain website.

 

IMPORTANT: On 1 September 2017, Celotex took the precautionary measure to temporarily suspend the supply of Celotex FR5000, Celotex CG5000, Celotex CF5000 and Celotex SL5000 while we investigate the results of recent tests (Parts 6 and 7 of British Standard 476). In addition, we have recently identified a compliance issue relating to our calculation and testing of the declared lambda value of products in the 4000 and 5000 ranges and the Crown-Bond and Crown-Fix products within the Crown Flat Roofing range. Due to this issue, the suspension of the 5000 range will continue and now includes the FI5000 and GD5000 products. Materials relating to the 5000 range products are for information only. Please note that all products in the TB4000, GA4000 below 100mm, PL4000 and CW4000 ranges manufactured after 15 December 2017 will be marketed from January as Celotex 3000 with a declared lambda value of 0.023 W/mK.

Please use the link below to read our full statement regarding declared lambda:

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Please use the link below to read our latest statement regarding Class 0:

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This post discusses Building Regulations surrounding garage conversions and how to best comply with them.

Here at the Technical Centre we talk to a lot of people who are converting existing garages into a habitable space.  Moving into a bigger house or climbing the property ladder may prove costly for some at a difficult time economically, so the idea of making better use of their existing space is favourable.  This makes sense when a lot of garages are typically used to store all sorts of ‘stuff’ and not always the car.

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