Welcome to the Celotex Insulation Blog

Here you will find the latest articles written by our insulation specialists focusing on product developments, building regulations and technical guidance notes.

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Latest articles written by our insulation experts


As the UK market leader in premium performance PIR insulation solutions, Celotex remains the insulation specialist of choice. We put a great deal of commitment in to ensuring our customers have a high quality product that is in compliance with evolving Building Regulations, helping you achieve better U-values and thinner solutions. Here at Celotex we often get asked, ‘how can I buy Celotex?’, so this brief blog points you in the right direction.

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What are Celotex Energy Assessments?


Celotex Energy Assessments (CEA)
 provide a comprehensive range of energy efficiency and sustainability services.It can be difficult working to ever-changing Regulations but keeping up to date or even planning ahead is something we at Celotex can help with. Our energy assessment service demonstrates that we would rather build a long-term relationship with you than do a one-off job.

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Update – IMPORTANT: On 23 June 2017, in view of the focus on components of rainscreen cladding systems, Celotex stopped the supply of Celotex RS5000, pending further clarity.  RS5000 remains suspended. Celotex do not currently supply a solution for buildings over 18 metres.

In December 2017 we identified a compliance issue relating to our calculation and testing of the lambda value of products in our 4000 and 5000 range and the Crown-Bond and Crown-Fix products within Crown Flat Roofing range. Material such as product downloads & specifications is for information only.

On 30 January 2018, Celotex made a further public announcement in relation to the full system testing of RS5000 pursuant to BS8414:2.  The announcement can be read here

 

On September 19th 1928, construction started in New York on the Chrysler Building. Standing 319m high to the top of the spire the Chrysler building held the record for the world’s tallest building for less than a single year, when it was surpassed by the newly completed Empire State Building.

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Designed in a distinctive Art Deco style, the façade of the Chrysler Building is constructed entirely of bricks over a load bearing internal steel frame.

Approximately 3,826,000 bricks were used in the construction of the outer walls – each laid by hand. The building was constructed over the course of 18 months and completed on 20th May 1930.

The Chrysler building stands today as an American cultural icon and still remains the world’s tallest brick structure. Whilst this building stands as a unique example of the versatility of bricks, the imperatives of modern building design make them a challenging choice for today’s high rise buildings.

Rainscreen Cladding

Ventilated facade systems offer a number of benefits to the building designer.

Lightweight, durable and available in a huge range of materials, rainscreen systems allow buildings to achieve their aesthetic goals whilst utilising practical construction methods.

A typical rainscreen construction consists of non-structural cladding panels supported by aluminium brackets and rails. A drained and ventilated cavity is maintained behind the cladding and the system is fixed back to a lightweight metal frame or masonry substrate. Insulation material can be provided behind the cladding and optionally between the metal frame where present.

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Update – IMPORTANT: On 23 June 2017, in view of the focus on components of rainscreen cladding systems, Celotex stopped the supply of Celotex RS5000, pending further clarity.  RS5000 remains suspended. Celotex do not currently supply a solution for buildings over 18 metres.

In December 2017 we identified a compliance issue relating to our calculation and testing of the lambda value of products in our 4000 and 5000 range and the Crown-Bond and Crown-Fix products within Crown Flat Roofing range. Material such as product downloads & specifications is for information only.

On 30 January 2018, Celotex made a further public announcement in relation to the full system testing of RS5000 pursuant to BS8414:2.  The announcement can be read here

This month the Technical Twitter Takeover discussed rainscreen cladding applications including questions on fixings, membranes and moisture. If you have a further question, let us know using #AskCelotex or reply to this blog post.

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The 22nd – 26th of September is World Green Building Week and the UK Green Building Council is encouraging all of us to “Get up, Green up”.

So what can we do? What springs to mind to help reduce energy consumption?

1. Turn the TV off standby?

2. Turn out the lights when you leave the room?

3. Install low energy light bulbs for when you do need the lights on?

4. Look at you homes EPC certificate?

I expect the first 3 are very familiar but perhaps number 4 is one that may leave one or two people scratching their heads and turning to the all-knowing entity that is Google for inspiration.

EPCs

An EPC is the Energy Performance Certificate for your house. Whenever you sell or rent, you must, by law have an EPC for the property. For many people, when selling the house, this is just another annoying expense top on top of all the other many forms and documents that are required at this stressful time.  The EPC survey gets done, you get the EPC report, perhaps give it a passing glance as you stuff in a file then and move onto more pressing matters as the trauma that is ‘moving house’ engulfs you.

When you move into your new house of course, there will be an EPC report waiting for you, as the previous owners will have had to get one done as well. Once again though, the fun that is unpacking boxes, sorting out utility companies, and generally trying to maintain your grip on reality tends to mean most of us will just leave the EPC report in a file, only to be discovered when we decide to move all over again.

So, the one of the best ways to help with sustainability is to Get Up, find your EPC report and see how you can Green Up your property.

An EPC rating (from A being the best through to G being as far away from great as you can get) is a bit like the housing equivalent of the miles per gallon on your car. However, the EPC report does more than just tell you the rating, it tells you how to:

  • Increase the efficiency of your home so you can move up the EPC scale
  • Reduce your home’s impact on the environment
  • Save yourself money on your energy bills.

Here is page one of an example EPC taken from the Government website

epc

What does an EPC include?

  • Estimated energy costs of the home
  • Savings possible if improvements are made to the lighting, heating and hot water
  • Current and potential future (if recommendations are followed) Energy Efficiency Rating
  • Top actions that can be taken with cost and saving on each

Armed with this information you can set about planning the work that needs to be done to do your bit for the environment and ease the burden on your back pocket. The EPC even lists those measures that are eligible under the Government’s Green Deal scheme, where you do not have to put any money up front and the cost of the measures is paid for out of the savings on your fuel bills.

If the idea of Green Deal doesn’t appeal and you are not too fussed about having lower fuel bills there is another reason to Get Up and Green Up by following the EPC recommendations: House Prices.

Research by DECC showed that those properties with a higher EPC rating commanded a higher selling price.

EPC Rating % Higher selling price compared to ‘G’   rating
E   & F 6%
D   & E 8%
C 10%
A   & B 14%

Need more convincing?

If all that isn’t enough to convince you, there is political talk in the run up to the next general election that encouragement is needed to get the population to help reduce the CO2 emissions from existing buildings.

At the moment 27% of the UK’s CO2 emissions come from homes. How to incentivise us, the voters? Tax. It is possible that tax breaks, perhaps on Stamp Duty or Council Tax will be possible and they will be linked to ….. yes, you guessed it, the EPC rating of your home.

There are many good reasons to Get Up, Green up and seek out that EPC report. If you act upon the recommendations: your bills will reduce; your property value will go up,  and one day you might even get one over on the Tax Man. The planet will thank you as you do your bit for a sustainable environment. Everyone’s a winner.

performance gap blog image-1

How does your house perform? Ask many homeowners and they would look at you in a puzzled way and start to edge towards the door. Ask them how their car performs and you are likely get somewhere in the answer a mention of the miles per gallon. Efficiency of cars is front of mind, that of your house, unless you are unusually familiar with its EPC (Energy Performance Certificate) lurks in the back somewhere behind the more pressing issues of room sizes, quality of kitchen/bathroom and whether it has anywhere to park the car.

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Update – IMPORTANT: On 23 June 2017, in view of the focus on components of rainscreen cladding systems, Celotex stopped the supply of Celotex RS5000, pending further clarity.  RS5000 remains suspended. Celotex do not currently supply a solution for buildings over 18 metres.

In December 2017 we identified a compliance issue relating to our calculation and testing of the lambda value of products in our 4000 and 5000 range and the Crown-Bond and Crown-Fix products within Crown Flat Roofing range. Material such as product downloads & specifications is for information only.

On 30 January 2018, Celotex made a further public announcement in relation to the full system testing of RS5000 pursuant to BS8414:2.  The announcement can be read here

Celotex balloon icon

We have once again demonstrated our innovative credentials with the launch of Celotex RS5000, a new premium performance PIR solution specifically designed for rainscreen cladding applications.

The latest addition to the ‘5000’ series product range, Celotex RS5000 has successfully tested to BS 8414-2:2005, meets the criteria set out in BR 135, and therefore is acceptable for use in buildings above 18 metres in height.

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scotish flag

No, not the big ‘In or out’ question on September the 18th, I am referring to an area where Scotland has been quite independent for some time – Building Regulations.

The Scottish equivalent to the English Part L is something called Section 6 and it, like its English counterpart, has been due for an amendment. There was a consultation on proposed changes that closed on 15th April 2013 and we have just had a response back after 16 months. It seems no matter what side of the border you are, the regulatory wheels turn just as slowly.

Implementation of the proposed changes will not happen until October 2015, so you could be forgiven for perhaps not caring too much right now. However, with the longer term question of what to do about Zero Carbon in 2016, the shape of Section 6 in late 2015 may give us a clue as to just what kind of specification challenge may lay ahead.

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