Celotex ‘Beyond Part L 2013’ CPD

Don’t forget! Celotex has an online CPD available right now until the 3rd of April – ‘Beyond Part L 2013‘. The online module via Building.co.uk provides guidance on what to expect from the 2016 energy targets for new homes, and how to ensure compliance.

The article is accredited by the CPD Certification Service. To earn CPD credits, read the article and then click the link below to complete your details and answer the questions. You will receive your results instantly, and if all the questions are correctly answered, you will be able to download your CPD certificate straight away.

Background

Part L of the Building Regulations, which covers the conservation of fuel and power, last changed on 6 April 2014, reducing CO2 emissions from new-build houses by 6% and for other non-domestic buildings by 9%. Part L 2013 is a key regulatory tool in driving CO2 reduction in the built environment and has been used to map out a path to zero carbon houses by 2016.

The Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH) is a voluntary scheme, introduced in 2007, which links with the CO2 reductions in Part L. For example, the 25% CO2 reduction in Part L 2010 over 2006 levels was equivalent to the energy requirement of CSH level 3. This gave designers, specifiers and manufacturers an indication of how regulatory requirements might evolve. The timeline linking Part L and CSH initially looked like this:

Part L version CO2 reduction CSH level
2006 Baseline
2010 25% over 2006 3
2013 44% over 2006 4
100% reduction 5
2016 100% reduction and net zero carbon 6

The expected change in Part L 2013 was 25% over 2010. However, as stated, only a 6% reduction was introduced, so the relationship between Part L and CSH looks more like this:

Part L version CO2 reduction CSH level
2006 Baseline
2010 25% over 2006 3
2013 29.5% over 2006
100% reduction 5
2016 100% reduction and net zero carbon 6
Celotex CPD Beyond Part L 2013

 

This threw into doubt the planned trajectory towards zero carbon homes. If the 2016 target remained in place, there would have to be a much greater leap in reducing CO2 emissions at the next stage than had been anticipated.

The Queen’s Speech in June 2014 clarified that there would be a new definition for zero carbon. All new houses will have to be built to CSH level 4, with the extra CO2 reduction for level 5 achieved through a mechanism called Allowable Solutions.

Allowable Solutions is intended to allay concerns that it may not always be feasible to reduce CO2 emissions to zero using purely on-site methods. The system would provide a variety of methods for housebuilders to offset carbon. Proposals include:

  • the use of connected measures such as a heat network
  • the housebuilder taking their own off-site carbon reduction measures, such as retrofitting existing buildings
  • the use of a third party to offset the required amount of carbon or payment into a carbon abatement fund.

It is expected that these will be confirmed in amendments to the Infrastructure Bill in 2015.

The Next Version Of Part L

To find out more and complete this online CPD, please visit Building.co.uk.

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